Sewing · Slow Fashion

Waterfall Raglan by Chalk & Notch

waterfall-raglan

When I saw Inês from La Folie in her Waterfall raglan shirt, I was immediately hooked! I’ve been keeping my eye out for a relaxed knit shirt that would work over leggings or stretchy pants and be totally age appropriate. The Waterfall raglan is utter perfection.

Details

waterfall-raglan

The pattern sewed together really quickly. I have a lot of experience sewing basic knit shirts, so it only took me 45 minutes. The raglan sleeves make this easier than trying to set in normal sleeves and with some of the additional tips ‘n tricks down below, gathering the ruffle, getting a good neckband, and hemming shouldn’t be too daunting.

What makes this pattern so fantastic is the fit. First, the neckband is just right. Not too high, not too low, the perfect goldilocks amount! Second, the pattern comes with three sleeve length options. I went with the three-quarters length sleeve, because I’m not quite ready to admit that winter is over. Third,  the length of the Waterfall raglan shirt was just perfect for me. I love how the front just covers the tummy and crotch, but curves upwards to still give you a figure. A lot of times when a shirt is so long and covers your hips, you start looking frumpy with no form. Let’s just say, shift dresses look bad on me! The shirt works perfectly around the bust for me as well. Often times I have to do a full bust adjustment, but this pattern flows idyllically. The shirt just lays so as to not draw attention to that region unnecessarily. It also doesn’t cling to your derrière while walking!  Finally, the back of the shirt is long enough to cover the bum, which is really a must when wearing leggings. So if you can believe it, the shirt is long enough in the front and back, but high enough at the hips, all while providing you with a flattering, sliming silhouette.

waterfall-raglan

Tips ‘n Tricks

If you are on the edge about making this pattern, here are some additional tips ‘n tricks to make your life easier.

Gathering the Ruffle

The first step is to gather the ruffle and sew it to the front and back pieces accordingly. Now I opted for my preferred method of gathering the fabric using clear swimsuit elastic. To find out more about this method, head over to Colette’s blog and brush up on Method 2 where you stretch as you sew. By gathering my fabric in this way, when I wanted to sew it to the front and back top half, it came out perfectly. Just a tip though, I gather as I sew using a zigzag stitch on my sewing machine, because it is just a little bit easier. I don’t really need the elastic to be overlocked to the fabric. Just a small zigzag stitch will do. Then when I run the two pieces of fabric through the serger to sew the top and the ruffle together, I prefer putting the gathered fabric on the bottom and the straight fabric on top.

Getting the Perfect Neckband Length

For the neckband, I used the shortest length. The pattern came with several neckband options for each size and a knit stretch guide to help achieve the perfect neckband fit. If you are using any Art Gallery Knit fabrics, I would suggest using the neckband option that is the shortest. The first time I used the longer 50 – 70% stretch option and it wasn’t tight enough so there was gapping and odd warbling. I shortened the neckband and all was perfect.

Hemming Perfection

The last lifesaver was using this 1-inch double sided fusible stay tape to hem the shirt and sleeves. Knit fabrics have a tendency to roll. This stay tape is extremely easy to iron on, which prevents the fabric from rolling as you try to measure and fold up the hem the correct length. Additionally, you can iron the hem in place since it is double sided, so no need to pin the hem to hold it together. Bonus bonus. Finally, and this is the best part, after you’ve completed your shirt, because you have that little bit of interfacing in the hem, the shirt bottom will never roll!! Don’t worry the interfacing is so light that you don’t really loose any stretchiness either.

The Waterfall raglan is a great new pattern and with these tips ‘n tricks should be an easy sew even for a new beginner.

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